Difference between revisions of "Presentation OSS licenses"

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Presentation on OSS licenses by Maurits Westerik (Presenting at the BioAssist programmers meeting on [[Agenda BioAssist Programmers Meeting 2010/02/19|19 February, 2010]]).
 
Presentation on OSS licenses by Maurits Westerik (Presenting at the BioAssist programmers meeting on [[Agenda BioAssist Programmers Meeting 2010/02/19|19 February, 2010]]).
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There's a [[{{TALKPAGENAMEE}}|discussion]] page for this article --[[User:Pieterb|Pieter van Beek]]
  
 
[http://www.twobirds.com/English/LAWYERS/Pages/Maurits_Westerik_1.aspx Maurits] is a member of the Intellectual Property and Information Technology Groups of Bird & Bird in The Netherlands. He specialises in intellectual property, especially in technology-related IP and life sciences-related patent cases. Maurits studied law at the University of Leiden and is a graduate of the international programme of the Institute for Political Sciences (SciencePo) in Paris. He has been an IP/IT lawyer in Amsterdam since 2004, before joining Bird & Bird in 2007. Maurits is an active speaker on IP strategy and also teaches IP law as guest lecturer at the Universities of Amsterdam, Leiden and Delft.
 
[http://www.twobirds.com/English/LAWYERS/Pages/Maurits_Westerik_1.aspx Maurits] is a member of the Intellectual Property and Information Technology Groups of Bird & Bird in The Netherlands. He specialises in intellectual property, especially in technology-related IP and life sciences-related patent cases. Maurits studied law at the University of Leiden and is a graduate of the international programme of the Institute for Political Sciences (SciencePo) in Paris. He has been an IP/IT lawyer in Amsterdam since 2004, before joining Bird & Bird in 2007. Maurits is an active speaker on IP strategy and also teaches IP law as guest lecturer at the Universities of Amsterdam, Leiden and Delft.

Revision as of 12:23, 25 January 2010

Presentation on OSS licenses by Maurits Westerik (Presenting at the BioAssist programmers meeting on 19 February, 2010).

There's a discussion page for this article --Pieter van Beek

Maurits is a member of the Intellectual Property and Information Technology Groups of Bird & Bird in The Netherlands. He specialises in intellectual property, especially in technology-related IP and life sciences-related patent cases. Maurits studied law at the University of Leiden and is a graduate of the international programme of the Institute for Political Sciences (SciencePo) in Paris. He has been an IP/IT lawyer in Amsterdam since 2004, before joining Bird & Bird in 2007. Maurits is an active speaker on IP strategy and also teaches IP law as guest lecturer at the Universities of Amsterdam, Leiden and Delft.

As a member of Bird & Bird’s Open Source Knowledge Group, Maurits has translated the popular open source GPLv3 software licence into Dutch. The translation is available on the GNU site.

Requested Topics for this talk:

  • Role of copyright in licensing
  • What is the difference between copyright/auteursrecht/intellectual property?
  • What about all this code people gave to me over the years that has no copyright statement or license?
  • Who is the 'owner' of my work ? Me, the company I work for, or the financing party ?
  • Dual licensing
  • License compatibility

Additional questions to be addressed:

  • Can I use open-source platforms to develop commercial software? (like Eclipse, MySQL, ...) (added by Dmitry Katsubo)
  • Can I re-use the parts of the source code (e.g. method, algorithm implementation) covered by LGPL licence in GPL project or in commercial project? (added by Dmitry Katsubo)
  • Can I use optional dependency to GPL library in commercial project? [1] (added by Dmitry Katsubo)

Please, prove/disapprove the statements with references to corresponding license (or laws) chapters.

Footnotes

  1. optional dependency is a run-time dependency (in contrast to compile-time), that does not block the general program execution, but makes some functions (that depend on that library) unavailable, if library is missing